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The Tufts Daily
Where you read it first | Friday, June 14, 2024

Arts




The Setonian
Arts

Defeat the heat with these upcoming summer blockbusters

As the Class of 2008 leaves Tufts amid a frenzy of exams, job searches and final merrymaking, post-graduation blues will inevitably set in soon. But don't despair! These summer movie blockbusters will be sure to bring back fond Tufts memories. "Speed Racer" (May 9): If only the Joey could move this fast. Imagine that little white bus making its way to Davis when you check out the Wachowski brothers' adaptation of the Japanese anime series. Emile Hirsch, John Goodman and Christina Ricci round out the car-racing cast, and it should be interesting to see the makers of the "Matrix" trilogy tackle a family film. "The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian" (May 16): Having been through the struggle of fitting 18 years' worth of belongings into a tiny dorm closet, any Tufts student is sure to identify with the awe and wonder these kids experience when they find an entire world in a wardrobe. The second installment of the series follows the Pevensie children in their return to Narnia, where they help overthrow an evil king and restore the rightful heir to the throne. "Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull" (May 22): Doesn't every archaeology major wish their studies abroad could have been this full of adventure? Continuing the slew of sequels hitting theaters this summer, Steven Spielberg presents the fourth "Indy" film. Prepare to be impressed by the persistent, 64-year-old Harrison Ford, accompanied by Shia LaBeouf, as they battle villainous Soviets (including Cate Blanchett) for treasured artifacts. "Sex and the City: The Movie" (May 30): Boston's no NYC, but what will Tufts graduates do without Newbury Street shopping? Catch the highly anticipated big-screen debut of the popular television series with the dynamic foursome of Sarah Jessica Parker, Kim Cattrall, Cynthia Nixon and Kristin Davis. Rumor has it we'll learn Mr. Big's full name, find out about a pregnancy and maybe even (gasp!) a death. But we know you'll only be watching the shoes anyway.


The Setonian
Arts

Drama major pursues dream

Senior Joel Perez came to Tufts as a pre-med student. Little did he know that just four years later, he would be graduating with a degree in drama and a promising acting career on his horizon. Although he had been involved in theater at his high school, it wasn't until the end of his freshman year that Perez landed his first role in a Tufts production, when he appeared in Torn Ticket II's "Children of Eden." At the beginning of his sophomore year, Perez was still unsure of his plans for the future. But a performance in Torn Ticket II's "Hair" that year cemented his love for acting. "It was the most amazing experience I ever had," Perez said. "We created a great environment onstage, and I was able to be a part of something that creates such an emotional response in the people around me." During the second semester of his junior year, Perez auditioned for and was accepted into the British American Drama Academy in London. Last summer, he was an acting apprentice at the Williamstown Theater Festival and had a small part in a commercial for Air Jordan shoes that aired last February. These achievements went a long way in reassuring his parents, who were initially "a little apprehensive," Perez said. This year, Perez was awarded the Goddard Rhetorical Prize by the faculty of the Tufts Department of Drama and Dance. According to Barbara Grossman, the chair of the Drama Department, the award "goes to two members of the graduating class who, in the opinion of the department faculty, are the most outstanding actors." The prizes are awarded each year, always to one male and one female. Senior Kasey Collins received this year's award alongside Perez. Created in 1862, the Goddard Rhetorical Prize is one of Tufts' oldest awards. It "shows the long-standing history of the performing arts at Tufts," said Grossman. Perez received the award for his theatrical development and flexibility. "People felt that he really demonstrated enormous growth, achievement and versatility in a variety of productions," Grossman said. "He just seemed to be the most deserving recipient. He shows excellent promise."


The Setonian
Arts

TV Recap | What matters most: a year in popular television

The past year was an especially turbulent one for television. A myriad of new shows with laughable premises were able to get the green light, ranging from the renovated cult classic "American Gladiators" to ridiculous new reality shows such as "My Dad Is Better Than Your Dad." There were also some new hits, like the overwhelmingly morbid yet intensely adorable "Pushing Daisies," a show dealing with a man who has the magical power of bringing the dead to life, as well as action TV drama "Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles."



The Setonian
Arts

Antonio López García explores life's diversity in all of its facets

Just as in economics and politics, the art world is often separated by geography into the center and the periphery. For the past 30 years, the center has always seemed to be New York City, but even here, the world's flatness has taken its toll. "Antonio López García" at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, a retrospective of a Spanish realist painter largely unacknowledged outside of Spain, is another outburst in the fight to equalize periphery and center.


The Setonian
Arts

Story of the Year puts the 'rage' in 'average'

After the success of its breakthrough 2003 album "Page Avenue," Story of the Year has struggled to define its identity in the strange rock scene of the day. The band's sophomore release for Maverick Records, "In the Wake of Determination" (2006), charted poorly, failed to spawn a successful single and, even worse for fans, strayed from the band's screamo-rock roots to a more metal direction.


The Setonian
Arts

Moyra Davey zooms in on everyday life at the Harvard art museum's Fogg Exhibit

The easiest way to label oneself as an artist, some would argue, would be to get a digital camera, shift the mode to black and white and proceed to take numerous "artsy" photos of Coke bottles, spoons and other random objects. But while some may scoff at such attempts, photographer Moyra Davey has used just this approach - with great success - to reveal the profundity of everyday objects.


The Setonian
Arts

Absurdity abounds in self-titled album from Kiwi comedy duo Flight of the Conchords

Just in case you've never heard of Flight of the Conchords, the self-proclaimed No. 2 folk-parody duo from New Zealand, do yourself a favor and hop onto YouTube.com to do some research. For those in the know, the band has finally released its first full-length album, full of hits from the pair's HBO series such as "Hiphopopotamus vs. Rhymenocerous" and "Business Time."



The Setonian
Arts

Phantom Planet busts out of its mold with 'Raise the Dead'

Five years ago, Phantom Planet was momentarily famous for two reasons. The first was a catchy pop sound so sunny that "California" became the ubiquitous theme for "The O.C." The second was the presence of actor Jason Schwartzman ("Rushmore" (1998)) behind the drum kit.


The Setonian
Arts

R.E.M. reclaims its good name with 'Accelerate'

R.E.M. is one of those bands that is often mentioned in passing while discussing 1980s new wave music or dropped by the insecure as a hint that they have good taste. But in the new millennium, how many people can actually name an R.E.M. song, let alone an album? The answer, unfortunately, is fewer than one might think.


The Setonian
Arts

Black Keys take a leap of faith with latest album

The Black Keys have quickly come to be known as a member of the elite duo of lo-fi blues-rock duos. Together with the White Stripes, they've proven that an electric guitar and a drum set can rock even harder than what is traditionally known as a "full band."



The Setonian
Arts

'Punk' scores laughs for all the wrong reasons

Fearless Records does it again with its most recent release of "Punk Goes Crunk," another one of its theme compilation albums. This 15-song CD is a collection of hip-hop and rap covers from some of the most prominent up-and-coming "punk" bands in the industry. Albums like this have been released before, all with the "Punk Goes..." title; the 1980s and '90s albums sold to some success, and their two acoustic albums (in which artists play their singles stripped down) are very popular. Of course, these albums are just gimmicks to get a little side cash for the artists and labels. "Punk Goes Crunk," however, may not provide the return that the investors were looking for.


The Setonian
Arts

Viewers will be 'blown away' by the complex versatility of screenprints in the Julie Chae Gallery's latest artistic exhibit

This month, the Julie Chae Gallery presents "BLOW ME AWAY: works on paper," a group show composed of five artists. The show introduces these very different artists, exploring the way they use the notion of fantasy and the medium of paper. With well over fifty pieces, the show is very complex. It demonstrates the versatility of this medium, both in terms of technique and style. The gallery continues its tradition of showcasing young artists: Brian Chippendale has been exhibiting since 1995, and the others (Christopher Davison, Nicole DePonte, Jungil Hong and Kevin Hooyman) all started after 2000.


The Setonian
Arts

Muse explodes onto the stage in 'H.A.A.R.P.'

Muse has long been a band that's fallen under the radar of most popular rock enthusiasts in the United States, and it's truly a tragedy that such is the case. The band's epic rock style, complete with music videos featuring laser-shooting, motorcycle-riding space cowboys, is one of the only entirely novel sounds the rock world has seen of late.


The Setonian
Arts

'Street Level' exhibit at the ICA is a quiet show of loud work

The Boston Institute for Contemporary Art (ICA) is currently hosting a small show that, despite its size, packs a punch. Though it only highlights three artists - Mark Bradford, Robin Rhode and William Cordova - "Street Level" is a challenging exhibition that stands as a milestone for "street" artists slowly entering the art world.


The Setonian
Arts

Artists explore the dynamic qualities of water in exhibit

"Surrounded by Water: Expressions of Freedom and Isolation in Contemporary Cuban Art," now open at the Boston University Art Gallery and curated by graduate student Natania Remba, explores the ways in which Cuban artists use water as a metaphor.