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The Tufts Daily
Where you read it first | Saturday, April 20, 2024

Arts

The Setonian
Arts

The Hives' latest album quits monotony with fresh sound

The Hives, despite having enjoyed some measure of success in the past, seem to overestimate their "rocking" status. In comparison to fellow Euro rockers who broke the mainstream bubble, The Hives have yet to garner the level of success their attitude alludes to - let's just say that this isn't The Clash we're talking about.





The Setonian
Arts

Evans uses pop-culture iconography to jarring effect

Simple, elegant, harmonious: These words do not seem to be in Cliff Evans' vocabulary. Instead, words like "complex," "busy" and "cacophony" are better suited to describe the artwork of this young artist, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museums' artist-in-residence.


The Setonian
Arts

Harvard installation is like taking candy from a ... piece of art

A golden carpet greets visitors walking into the Carpenter Center for Visual Arts at Harvard. As eyes adjust to the shimmering mass of color, the shape becomes a clear rectangle, a sharply delineated plane. Upon moving closer, the field of gold coalesces into a tumble of shapes until it finally becomes apparent what the installation is made of: candy!



The Setonian
Arts

'Bend to Break' album snaps under even the lightest scrutiny

When Fred Mascherino left Taking Back Sunday at the end of October, diehard fans of the pop-punk outfit were upset and confused. Why would the lovable screaming backup vocalist and guitarist of the band suddenly drop all ties with the group? After being a critical part of Taking Back Sunday for over four years, Fred has (foolishly) decided to split with the band to focus on his solo project, entitled "The Color Fred."


The Setonian
Arts

Listeners certain to 'avenge' waste of time, money

Avenged Sevenfold is a band usually brushed aside by rock fans and critics alike. While some may argue that this is rather unfair, after listening to the band's newest self-titled effort, it seems that perhaps this discrimination is well warranted.


The Setonian
Arts

Whininess, lack of originality poke holes in armor of Sleep's newest album

New Jersey native Armor for Sleep made waves with its first two independent releases, "Dream to Make Believe" (2003) and "What to Do When You Are Dead" (2005), albums full of whiny emo anthems about how terrible life is in affluent suburbs. While these two releases aren't completely awful, they definitely left room for growth from the fairly young group.


The Setonian
Arts

GALLERY REVIEW | Bey portraits add depth to Newbury Street

Just as Diagon Alley blends into its surroundings, so does the Howard Yezerski Gallery on Newbury Street. Situated between Akris and Juicy Couture, this two-room gallery introduces a world radically and magically different from the commercial and material world of Newbury. The stunning photographs of teenagers in classrooms and on the streets of Harlem reflect the humanism absent from the mega-shopping district surrounding the gallery.


The Setonian
Arts

Walker works with black-and-white, delineating worst parts of human nature

Stark contrast repeats itself over and over again in Kara Walker's exhibit at the Fogg Museum at Harvard. Large lithographs hang in bold, black splashes to interrupt sterile whitewashed walls. The images themselves - altered reproductions of Civil War illustrations from Harper's Weekly - utilize only strong blacks on a white background, using marks to indicate depth and form. Walker's alterations appear in contrast - figural silhouettes superimposed over the original lithographs.





The Setonian
Arts

MIT Visual Arts exhibit will blow your mind and eardrums

The current exhibit at the MIT List Visual Arts Center is not a typical conceptual art exhibit. An exhibit focusing on sound seems to have no place in an art gallery where the focus is obviously and dutifully ocular; yet "Sounding the Subject: Selections from the Pamela and Richard Kramlich Collection and the New Art Trust" forces visitors to explore the connection between the auditory and the visual.


The Setonian
Arts

Jimmy's 'Light' shines, but not like 'American'

There are few bands left in the world today that are just generic, good rock bands. Jimmy Eat World bears the burden of being one of those bands and unfortunately, the group is constantly plagued with critics and fans attempting to brand them with a label.


The Setonian
Arts

J.Lo takes no chances on lackluster album 'Brave'

She's an actress, singer, dancer, fashion designer, perfumer and producer. Let's face it, Jennifer Lopez has truly mastered being one thing: herself. While Jen-of-All-Trades exudes all the qualities a superstar of her caliber should, her recent work has taken a turn for the mediocre. From films to music she does it all, but recently it all seems to have left viewers and listeners alike unsatisfied. Unfortunately, her latest effort and fifth English album, "Brave," is no exception.



The Setonian
Arts

Harvard exhibit proves teachers have lives outside of the classroom

While sitting in class and listening to a lecture, picturing the professor outside the classroom, not as a teacher but as a researcher, can be difficult. It's pretty surprising to discover that an archeology professor slathers on sunscreen and dons camp shirts instead of her usual skirt and pumps to excavate ruins in South America. This sentiment of awe is present at Harvard University's "VES New Faculty 2007-2008" show.


The Setonian
Arts

MFA exhibit depicts 'floating world' of 17th-century Japanese youth

Walking into the Boston Museum of Fine Arts' new exhibition of traditional Japanese paintings, "Drama and Desire: Japanese Paintings from the Floating World 1690-1850," the fresh and dynamic look of the show is utterly striking. The architecture of the entryway promotes a feeling of seclusion with a latticework of white beams, shrouding the paintings inside in an atmosphere that feels more like a temple than a museum gallery.