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The Tufts Daily
Where you read it first | Tuesday, April 23, 2024

Arts

The Setonian
Arts

The Ataris' underwhelming effort is more like ColecoVision

Hailing from Anderson, Ind., The Ataris are far from a new addition to the rock scene, but only recently have they released their second major label record, "Welcome the Night", four years after their debut, "So Long, Astoria." Upon first listening to the new album, it sounds nearly nothing like The Ataris from 2003, who had left a bruise on the hearts of teenagers across the nation with their catchy hit cover of Don Henley's "Boys of Summer."


The Setonian
Arts

1960s Fluxus Art at Harvard brings idealism back to the scene

It's never clear whether displaying conceptual art in a museum is in fact destroying it. How can one curate a show of art that is morally and philosophically opposed to its own role, mocking its own existence until it presents an impossibly vicious cycle of meaning and anti-meaning?


The Setonian
Arts

Student photography has lessons for its audience

The annual Student Exhibition at the Photographic Resource Center at Boston University collects photographic work from students gathered across the full spectrum of Boston area universities. It is by nature democratic, making no delineation between art school and liberal arts, freshman and senior.


The Setonian
Arts

Indie rockers craft audible Ambien on 'Back Numbers'

Dean Wareham and Britta Phillips have quite a reputation. Both have been active in the Boston, New York and London indie rock scenes for close to 20 years and have contributed to a plethora of celebrated bands, the most notable being lo-fi outfit Luna.


The Setonian
Arts

Acme exhibits Provincetown's expressionists

Artists Hans Hofmann and Nanno de Groot share some common threads. They were both foreign-born painters who had an intense desire to convey nature through abstract expressionism. They were also both important fixtures in the local art colony of Provincetown, Mass.


The Setonian
Arts

Miller Block Gallery looks 'through the lens'

Step out of the elevator into the bare, hardwood-floored Miller Block Gallery on Newbury Street and listen for the footfalls echoing across the hall into the gallery space. There sits "The City: Through the Lens," a small photography exhibit with huge breadth.




The Setonian
Arts

'The Brightness' represents the hell that is modern folk music

Ana's Mitchell joins Ani DiFranco and Andrew Bird on Righteous Babe Records with her label debut. Unfortunately, she does not quite follow in her acoustic guitar-toting predecessors' footsteps. "The Brightness" is a disappointment, especially coming from a record label with such prestigious releases. It is an album littered with bad poetry, unimaginative imagery and tedious guitar.



The Setonian
Arts

Bloc Party keeps on working for the 'Weekend' on new album

Bloc Party made a huge splash in 2005 with the release of their incendiary debut album, "Silent Alarm." Drummer Matt Tong's technical chops and hyperactive punk syncopation drove the band's raw instrumentals, while singer Kele Okereke wailed his way through the electrifying freshman effort.


The Setonian
Arts

Octogen gives house music some soul

Octogen, the pseudonym of Scotsman Marco Bernardi, has released his awaited debut album "2five0nine," an incursion into the microhouse music genre that is bound to make ears smile. The album showcases his confident blending of wee little bite-sized drum samples into delectable textures. Compared to his EP releases, Octogen manages to inject surprising amounts of emotion into the usually stark "drill-and-bass" backdrop.


The Setonian
Arts

Catching a blurry glimpse of Poland

An artist's creativity begets more than simply inspiration for new work. Artists always seem to find crafty ways to survive and even flourish under repression. In Poland's early Communist regime, art was confined to Soviet ideals, and artists who diverged from regulations faced censorship. Within this atmosphere, some resilient artists turned to a medium both economically viable and privately sustainable: that of pinhole photography.


The Setonian
Arts

We're here, we're kitschy, get used to it

After Chicago-based Fall Out Boy's apparent overnight success with their 2005 hit "Sugar We're Going Down," the band has ruled over what's left of the pop-punk genre with an iron fist. Beyond record sales and popularity, the band has developed, somewhat ironically, a huge cult following that idolizes bassist Pete Wentz as the immaculately conceived prophet of "the scene."


The Setonian
Arts

Museum exhibit proves you actually can learn something from Saturday morning television

It may just be a trick of the eye: A combination of the larger-than-life cartoon backdrop and an ambient sense of child-like wonder combine to make it seem like you've shrunk when you enter Animation, the 6,000 square foot interactive exhibit at the Museum of Science, Boston. Then again, tricks of the eye abound throughout the exhibit hall because, after all, that's exactly what animation is.



The Setonian
Arts

Donatello sculptures at the MFA deserve a 'cowabunga'

One of the Museum of Fine Arts' newest exhibits brings Italy a little closer to New England, showcasing many notable Renaissance sculptures. "Donatello to Giambologna: Italian Renaissance Sculpture" features works done by some of the greatest masters of the time, artists considered near equals to the revered Michelangelo.


The Setonian
Arts

Listeners have got a 'Friend' in Menomena

The progression of rock 'n' roll over the past half century is as much a testament to scientific discovery in the field of recording music as it is to musical creativity. Ever since the first guitarist plugged in so he could hear himself over the drummer, rock music and technology have tussled like two kids in the back of a cramped car on a road trip. Since then, for every egghead behind the scenes who thinks he can apply what he learned in science class to making music, there's some dimwit booing from the audience, acting like rock's got some purity to protect.



The Setonian
Arts

'China Series' captures tension and beauty of the country

Documentary photographer Edward Burtynsky presents the world as one that is permeated by tensions, including the struggle between industrialization and progress and the worry that the inexorable pace of advances in technology may not be wholly beneficial. His work deals with such omnipresent themes as the destruction of the environment and the presence man has imposed on nature. The difference between Burtynsky's work and purely documentary work is that he imbues his pictures with a sense of epic beauty rather than one of pure devastation and wrongdoing.


The Setonian
Arts

Stay up just to listen to Sloan for the night

You don't need to know anything about Sloan to see why they named their latest album "Never Hear the End of It," containing an amazing 30 tracks and 74 minutes of nonstop pop rock. This monster album takes weeks for one to fully absorb and appreciate and as one of the first releases of 2007, it certainly sets a high standard for what's to come this year.