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The Tufts Daily
Where you read it first | Monday, May 27, 2024

Coronavirus


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University

Tufts updates fall COVID-19 protocol, ends mask mandate and surveillance testing

In anticipation of welcoming students back to campus, Tufts announced its fall 2022 COVID-19 protocols in an email on Aug. 10. According to the email, the updated measures include the end of surveillance testing as well as the removal of a mask mandate. Infected students will also be directed to isolate in their rooms as opposed to the temporary housing on-campus students were asked to isolate in last academic year.


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Coronavirus

Tufts community members discuss the return to in-person classes

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, most classes at Tufts were conducted in a virtual or hybrid format from March 2020 to the end of the 2020–2021 school year. However, thanks in large part to the widespread distribution of vaccines throughout last spring and summer, the fall 2021 semester saw life at Tufts begin to slowly return to normal. While we were still required to wear masks indoors and frequently test for COVID-19, we saw the return of in-person club meetings and activities, as well as mostly in-person classes.


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University

Life in The Mods: 4 walls, 2 meals and an Uber Eats voucher

Since the start of the spring semester, hundreds of undergraduate students on the Medford/Somerville campus have tested positive for COVID-19, and many of them have been required to isolate in one of the modular housing units on the Vouté Tennis Courts. Many will be familiar with the procedure by now: After testing positive, students have 90 minutes to corral their linens and toiletries, pack their suitcases and make the trek to their assigned unit.


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Editorial

Editorial: Lessons from a year of crisis

With every day that goes by, it seems less likely that we will ever “return to normal” — any post-pandemic world will be radically different than the one we left behind a year ago. So as we reflect on all that we’ve lost in the past year, we should also take a moment to think about what kind of new “normal” we want to create for the years ahead.


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Coronavirus

Boston stadiums expected to allow fans beginning March 22

Massachusetts is expected to move into Phase 4 of its COVID-19 reopening plan on March 22, meaning that arenas, stadiums and ballparks will be allowed to operate at 12% capacity. In the near future, both TD Garden and Fenway Park may see fans in the stands for the first time since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic.






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Coronavirus

COVID-19 wreaks havoc in NFL Week 12  

With 2020 being the crazy year it has been, it is no surprise that the NFL would deal with its own uncertainties caused by the pandemic. Teams knew from the beginning that if they wanted to have a season, they would have to adapt and roll with the challenges that were thrown their way.









sportscenter
Coronavirus

NESCAC cancels fall sports season

The NESCAC announced last Friday that all sports events for the upcoming 2020 fall academic semester will be suspended. The statement did not outline how the conference will approach the winter and spring seasons, but stressed that the conference will continue to monitor public health and NCAA guidance and update the NESCAC rules accordingly.




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Columns

The Turf Monster: Favorite 2020 moments

I’m gonna be blunt. 2020 has been awful for sports. Approximately two and a half months into the pandemic, every single league without exception closed its doors for the foreseeable future. When they will resume is anyone’s guess.