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The Tufts Daily
Where you read it first | Monday, April 15, 2024

Features



PursuitofEggcellence-01
Columns

In Pursuit of Eggcellence: Trial Two — The Great Poaching

The soft-boiled egg is a master of suspense. You’ve boiled your water, you’ve followed the demanding beeps of your phone’s alarm to perfection and finally you simply hold the egg in your hands (not really, because 'ouch,' 'hot,' etc.) and wonder. There is no way of knowing what lies beneath the surface, what lurks below the inscrutable face of the eggshell. To crack the shell is a leap of faith. But every faith can be tested, and even the most devoted have their breaking point. Today, I’m skipping the suspense.



The Setonian
Column

Innocent Pleasures: Dancing’s not a crime

Stemming from my New Year’s resolution to practice more empathy and, partly inspired by the protagonist of Elaine Hsieh Chou’s “Disorientation” (2022) — who abstains from the act because “She [i]sn’t a Republican!”— is my intent to stop kink-shaming. Regardless of your political affiliation, I hope this column can convince you to join me in this endeavor. My broader aim, though, is twofold: one, to dismantle the concept of “guilty pleasures” and explore why we shouldn't be ashamed of the things that bring us joy and to advocate for the small and oft overlooked innocent pleasures that can add light to our lives if we know to let them.





The Setonian
Features

Talking Transit: What the new bus pilot program means

The MBTA blessed us last week with more data on the initial fare-free pilot for the Route 28 bus. The information is outlined in several media outlets, so I will not recount all of it here, but there are a few big takeaways. The first things worth mentioning are the pilot’s successes, because it had some quite notable ones. WBUR reported that the elimination of fares on the Route 28 bus increased ridership by 22%. This number is, furthermore, controlling for increases in ridership following the large initial drop off due to the pandemic, so it is quite impressive. A modest amount of riders — about 5% of those on the bus because it was free — would have driven otherwise. The pilot also helped make bus service fasteras lines to pay fares disappeared and riders could board the bus from either the front or back doors.





kateinparis
Features

Kate in Paris: Museums

Stumbling upon a museum in Paris has felt to me almost as common as traipsing in and out of the ‘boulangeries’ which dot seemingly every street corner of the city. Well, maybe not to that same degree — Paris boasts an astonishing 30,000-plus bakeries and almost 300 museums — but it certainly seems that way. Much of Parisian life and energy is intertwined with its art, literature and fashion. I really do savor the ability to stroll through a museum at my own pace, opening myself up to its knowledge. I have selected a few of my favorite museums and exhibits to share, ones which have each filled me with unique senses of joy and wonder.





The Setonian
Features

Potty Talk: Phantom Filene

It is possible that nobody has ever been inside Lincoln Filene Hall. Have you ever heard a friend tell you they’re off to class in Lincoln Filene? If you have, do you really believe them? This building, for all intents and purposes, does not exist. But still, as is the eternal condition of buildings around the world, it has bathrooms. And where there are bathrooms, there is Potty Talk.



The Setonian
Features

Talking Transit: What’s a guy gotta do to get some oversight around here?

If you were in the area last summer, you might remember hearing about a Green Line collision in Allston that injured nearly 30 people in July. Things didn’t stop there — in early September, Boston UniversityprofessorDavid Jones fell through rusted stairs near JFK/UMass and died. Later that month, an escalator reversed direction at Back Bay station, causing people to fall over each other like dominoes, injuring nine.



The Setonian
Features

Maker’s Space: The making of a makerspace list for the purpose of makers' making

With this being a brand-new column, I thought I’d take this week to offer some insight into the wonderful resources you have as a Tufts student. If I did my job right, my first article has left you thoroughly inspired to make something — a new side table, plate-ware or a cutting board, perhaps. But you’re stumped! You don’t have the tools or the space to get crazy and creative! Luckily for Tufts students looking to make, there are several free-to-use places on campus.