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The Tufts Daily
Where you read it first | Tuesday, June 25, 2024

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The Setonian
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Battle for the bulge: Fitness as a lifestyle

Between classes, they head to the gym. On their shelves, protein powder and textbooks dwell side by side. For students looking to gain mass and muscle, their hobby, fitness routine and diet can become a seamless lifestyle.


The Setonian
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Playing the name game makes a difference

When discussing their professors, students might commend lively lectures or innovative research, but more rarely do they cite a personal bond that developed over the course of the semester.





The Setonian
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A reluctant Mr. West

Let's face it — it ain't easy being famous. But what's worse? Looking like you're famous.     I've experienced the difficulties secondhand, as my good friend Alec Ernest has gone through the anguish, the utter affliction, of resembling Vince (Adrian Grenier) of "Entourage" — not only a celebrity, but a celebrity who plays a celebrity. Youch.     Unsurprisingly, Alec, tired of passively enduring his likeness to Vince, shaved his lustrous dark hair in a bold attempt to sever any association between him and his more glamorous lookalike. On the bright side, it's now easier for him to mask the fact that he only showers once a semester. But Alec isn't the only one who has had to grapple with the adversity that is looking like the bold and beautiful.     There is a man among us who you may have, once or twice, mistaken for the Louis Vuitton don himself, Kanye West. Known as, "the guy who looks like Kanye" or "Clone-ye West," he cruises the quad in his mayonnaise jaguar, bringing music to the lay people: "I gotta testify, come up in the spot looking extra fly / For the day I die, I'mma touch the sky."     Not only do he and Kanye share a peculiar likeness, but they also seem to share a number of character traits: the laid-back yet socially vigilant disposition, the ample amount of confidence and yes, that kinetic aura — the swagger that demands your attention, makes you nod your head and say "Aww, yeaah ... That guy — he's got it." Often watching him sport a smart suit and his bluetooth headset, I've wondered whether or not he knows he's not Kanye. That is, until I met him.     A few days back, I summoned the strength to approach Clone-ye in Carmichael, inquiring about his feelings concerning his resemblance to the prophet Mr. West. Perchance I was lacking in tact, because, while good humored, he seemed a tad bit peeved by the question. Registering his reaction, I ensured him the article would be an attempt to get at the true "guy who looks like Kanye," so that those who don't know him personally could begin to recognize him for all that he does around campus. If successful, this column could be a means to divest him both of the stigma of being a celebrity lookalike and the titles that have come to shadow his true name.     Still, he would have none of it. Ironically, his decision will only serve to perpetuate the mythology surrounding "the guy who looks like Kanye" and ensure that such a title remains.     It is at this juncture that we may turn to the wise words of Kanye West himself, who, in his hit song "All Falls Down" proclaims, "We all self-conscious / I'm just the first to admit it." After taking a moment to filter through the faux-modesty and egregious self-importance of the statement, we see that Kanye has brought up a relevant point: We are all self-conscious in varying degrees, and instead of being ashamed, we should embrace our self-consciousness as a necessary part of being human and move on. With that said, I beseech you who've been dealt the unfair plight of sharing a celebrity's countenance to follow Mr. Ernest's lead and declare yourself separate and all together unassociated with the celebrity you resemble.     "Guy who looks like Kanye," I am ready and willing to give this another try. I'd like to let Tufts in on all those things that you don't have in common with Sir Kanye West — all the things you do better, like not wearing those stupid shuttered glasses and using restraint when considering beating up members of the media (wink, wink). Until then, I hope you find peace.




The Setonian
News

Homecoming '08: Bye, Bye Bobcats

Despite the swampy conditions on Homecoming Saturday, most Tufts teams put together winning efforts against the visiting Bates Bobcats. The football squad dominated with a 34-7 victory in front of a faithful gathering of soaked but stalwart spectators. The field hockey squad came out on top 4-2 and the women's soccer team won 2-0. The only loss of the weekend came from the men's soccer squad, which fell 2-0.




The Setonian
News

Financial Crisis 101

Negotiators met at the White House with President George W. Bush yesterday to discuss bailout plans in order to confront the recent economic crisis. Though the meeting was the first step in handling the issue, the talks are still very much in their preliminary phases.


The Setonian
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Financial Crisis 101: A Dictionary

For non-economics majors, the intricacies of the economy and the terms thrown around to describe today's financial woes can be tough to grasp. Today, the Daily provides a list of commonly used economic terms and offers a simpler explanation of them.


The Setonian
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Financial Crisis 101: Housing bubbles, interest rates and bailouts

This article is the first in a two-part series on the ongoing financial crisis on Wall Street. Today's piece will focus on the underlying causes of the problem; Monday's piece will examine the proposed government bailout plan and the implications of the crisis as a whole.Click here to read part 2.


The Setonian
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Pep rally relocates due to weather concerns

An array of student performers will work to stir up campus pride at tonight's Homecoming pep rally, which has been moved to the campus center due to a dreary weather forecast.


The Setonian
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Student-led effort leads to dorm improvements

Current residents of West and Metcalf Halls are enjoying new furniture, wireless Internet and fresh coats of paint in their common rooms thanks to an initiative last semester from two Tufts Community Union (TCU) senators.


The Setonian
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Gephardt urges action on economic crisis

Former House Majority Leader and presidential candidate Dick Gephardt (D-Mo.) ate lunch with Tufts students in an ExCollege class yesterday. But first, he sat down with the Daily on a day when national lawmakers reached an impasse while debating a bailout for foundering financial companies. Gephardt answered our questions about the economy and the battle between Sens. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Barack Obama (D-Ill.).




The Setonian
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Drawing on experience, envoy offers advice on Afghanistan

Former U.S. Special Envoy James Dobbins drew on his personal experience in helping rebuild Afghanistan, giving the situation there a "mostly positive" review yesterday despite what he called serious bungling by the Bush administration.


The Setonian
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Speaker advocates for socialist solution in Iraq

Socialist activist Ayisha Zaki urged Tufts students to join a movement to push for the interests of the working class in the Middle East, blaming corporate interests for social plight in countries like her native Lebanon.


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