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The Tufts Daily
Where you read it first | Monday, April 15, 2024

Sacha Waters


Public-Cinemy
Columns

Public Cinemy No. 1: ‘Dream Scenario’ and its thesis on online culture

If I had to pick a favorite movie from 2023, I would pick “Dream Scenario,” the mid-budget fantasy film starring Nicolas Cage in all his crazed glory. The film centers on Cage’s character, run-of-the-mill biology professor Paul Matthews, who suddenly starts appearing in people’s dreams all over the world. Although his dream self first exists as a passive observer, it turns into a sadistic entity that brutally tortures the dreamer as Matthews starts taking advantage of his newfound fame. This prompts a social backlash that sees him placed on leave from his job and forced to exit public places when his presence makes people uncomfortable, culminating in his wife leaving him.

Public-Cinemy
Columns

Public Cinemy No. 1: The rise of the biopic and the death of the A-lister

“Bohemian Rhapsody.” “Blonde.” “Oppenheimer.” “The Iron Claw.” “Rocketman.” “Maestro.” “Elvis.” “Priscilla.” “Napoleon.” “Ferrari.” “Nyad.” All are films that came out in the last six years, and all are films that denote Hollywood’s staggering obsession with biopics. Biopics have always been a staple in American cinema, but their explosion in recent years is a Band-Aid over the fatal wounds dealt to Hollywood by streaming.

Public-Cinemy
Columns

Public Cinemy No. 1: Has reality television become more progressive?

American reality television in the 2000s was infamous. Strange concepts abounded, such as“My Strange Addiction” (2010–15), where subjects would confess to anything from eating half a roll of toilet paper a day to being in love with a car and “Bridalplasty” (2010–11), where brides competed in challenges to win a wedding and desired plastic surgeries. 

Public-Cinemy
Columns

Public Cinemy No. 1: Reality television in the digital age

Compared to the rest of the world, American television is infamous for its glossiness. Whereas British soaps and Italian reality TV shows tend to feature girls-next-door and regular Joes (Giuseppes?), US shows are chock-full of toned abs, low-cut tops, gleaming white teeth and other trademarks of the young and fit.

Public-Cinemy
Columns

Public Cinemy No. 1: Is ‘Barbie’ a feminist film?

​​One of the most talked-about films of this past year is undoubtedly Greta Gerwig’s “Barbie” (2023). The public consensus on the film’s politics is divided: In one camp, many praise it for portraying their experiences and highlighting feminist principles; in another, they complain of its attacks on patriarchy and toxic masculinity.

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Columns

Personal Praguenosis: Wake up, the Earth is flat

As an American abroad, you hear a lot of stereotypes: Americans are loud, narcissistic, obsessed with guns and can’t even point out another country on a map. There’s a whole host of often unflattering adjectives that come with the territory of “American.” 

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Columns

Personal Praguenosis: On set

Have you ever sat through the credits after a movie and watched thousands of names roll across the screen? I used to think there couldn’t be that many people in the country, let alone on a set. There are millions of titles I don’t even know the meaning of — key grip, best boy, script supervisor — all coming together to make one 90-minute feature. 

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