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The Tufts Daily
Where you read it first | Saturday, March 2, 2024

Sadie Leite


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Arts

Linnea Axelsson’s ‘Aednan’ is an epic story of stories

The English translation of “Aednan: An Epic,” by Sámi-Swedish writer Linnea Axelsson, came out on Jan. 9. Saskia Vogel completed the translation. The highly anticipated translation comes after much praise for the original, which was initially released in Swedish in 2018. That same year, it won the prestigious August Prize, which Sweden gives annually to the country’s best books.

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Columns

Compost in the daylight: Goodbyes

This column was supposed to be a place where I could just write 500 words and work on my storytelling. In some ways, I think my storytelling has improved. In other ways, I think there were never enough words to change it concretely. So, for this last one, I looked back on all the things I did not say.

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Columns

Compost in the Daylight: Accidental blessings

“My bat mitzvah merch was a legendary, lime-green horror.” At the end of a bar or bat mitzvah, the guests usually leave with a gift that showcases the child’s initials, service date and usually a silly symbol referencing the theme of their party. My theme was green.

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Columns

Compost in the Daylight: The wishing tower

Once upon a time, I traveled to a small country in Eastern Europe with two friends. We signed up for a road trip of sorts with a talkative tour guide and one other tourist: a middle-aged man who consistently cradled a small camera. Our first stop was a town with a wishing tower.

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Columns

Compost in the Daylight: Small-town ghosts

“I’m here with my friends at the graveyard.” One of my favorite books growing up wasNeil Gaiman’s “The Graveyard Book” (2008). It’s about a boy named Nobody Owens who is raised by ghosts in a graveyard after his entire family is murdered.

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Columns

Compost in the Daylight: A dead squirrel

There’s a note on my phone and it’s titled “What’s Important.” I think every writer or young person who’s thought they’ve had a great idea has something similar. It’s tucked away on their phone or in a journal or on scraps of paper floating in an accessible area. Those pieces of words never get off that list though, so I thought it was time they did. Or at least mine did. Here are some of the things I’ve written down:

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