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The Tufts Daily
Where you read it first | Tuesday, May 21, 2024

Chris Duncan


The Setonian
Features

Talking Transit: Something the T can actually be proud of

I often feel that this column complains too much. What can I say, there are a lot of problems with the T! But in an attempt to not get bogged down in negativity and nitpicking this week, it is worth stopping sometimes to appreciate what riders in our system have to be grateful for. Thankfully, the America’s Best Bus Stop competition over at the wonderful publication Streetsblog has given us a perfect opportunity to do just that.

The Setonian
Column

Talking Transit: At the end of the day, everything is old and sucks

Last week had a lot of transit news, and a lot of it was pretty good even! Notably, we got the first branch of the Green Line Extension, and the MBTA released their brand spankin’ new five-year capital investment plan. The plan itself showed promise, even though it frustratingly still has no real concrete plan for converting the commuter rail into an electrified regional rail network.

The Setonian
Column

Talking Transit: The Globe rubs salt in the wound

If you read the Boston Globe, you might have come across this article on Monday about what the T could have been. The crux of it centers on a map published by the paper in April 1947 showcasing planners’ proposals for an expansion of Boston’s T network. Looking at it now, knowing that so little of this has actually come to be, is a little bit heartbreaking.

The Setonian
Features

Talking Transit: What the new bus pilot program means

The MBTA blessed us last week with more data on the initial fare-free pilot for the Route 28 bus. The information is outlined in several media outlets, so I will not recount all of it here, but there are a few big takeaways. The first things worth mentioning are the pilot’s successes, because it had some quite notable ones. WBUR reported that the elimination of fares on the Route 28 bus increased ridership by 22%. This number is, furthermore, controlling for increases in ridership following the large initial drop off due to the pandemic, so it is quite impressive. A modest amount of riders — about 5% of those on the bus because it was free — would have driven otherwise. The pilot also helped make bus service fasteras lines to pay fares disappeared and riders could board the bus from either the front or back doors.

The Setonian
Features

Talking Transit: What’s a guy gotta do to get some oversight around here?

If you were in the area last summer, you might remember hearing about a Green Line collision in Allston that injured nearly 30 people in July. Things didn’t stop there — in early September, Boston UniversityprofessorDavid Jones fell through rusted stairs near JFK/UMass and died. Later that month, an escalator reversed direction at Back Bay station, causing people to fall over each other like dominoes, injuring nine.

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