Skip to Content, Navigation, or Footer.
The Tufts Daily
Where you read it first | Monday, April 15, 2024

Columns

graphic for Benjamin Rachel's A Jumbo's Journey column (features)
Columns

A Jumbo’s Journey: To me, you’re … copacetic

To preface this column publication, I want to say that I’ve never watched “Love Actually” (2003). My favorite Christmas movie is “It’s A Wonderful Life” (1946). The only things I know about “Love Actually” are that it is my mom’s favorite, and it has the scene where the dude stands outside the fence with a bunch of signs professing his love after the girl says to her (I would assume) partner, “it’s carol singers.” Which, I don’t know, has to be one of the most ridiculous things ever. Like, come on.


Graphic for deeksha bathini article “from classroom to clinic”
Column

From Classroom to Clinic: Medicine and motherhood, the case for cryopreservation in residency training

For most women, medical training coincides with their reproductive prime.The average age to matriculate to a medical residency program is 27.5 years old. In 2016, a study found that 24.1% of female physicians attempting conception struggled with infertility, compared to11% of the general female population in the U.S. When asked if study respondents would do anything differently, some subjects said they would have tried to have children sooner, chosen a different medical specialty or tried cryopreservation.



Graphic for Ethan Essner’s column “Attack of the B Movies”
Columns

Attack of the B-Movies: Fading away into ‘Altered States’

Cinema and hallucinogens: a match that’s a far cry from our typical pairings on television or theater screens. Yet, Ken Russell is one of those classic directors who doesn’t have any trouble submerging your head into pools of visual craziness. All the humdrum of any plot is thrown out the window and replaced with the utmost of sadistic experiences. His 1971 breakout masterpiece “The Devils” tackles sexual repression under the guise of the Roman Catholic church and is perhaps most infamous for splicing religious power and horniness with the ever-so sacred crucifix. Nearly ten years after “The Devils,” Russell coupled salvation with a magic mushroom trip in his 1980 film “Altered States.” This film possesses the off-kilter elements of a B-movie classic while also containing a remarkable lead performance from William Hurt.


graphic for Jeremy Gramson's "T Time" column
Columns

T Time: Ditch the Uber for the T

Typically, I use this column to focus on one specific MBTA station and the neighborhood surrounding it. However, I recently traveled out of Boston via plane and Amtrak, so I thought it would be helpful to discuss how to use the T to access other forms of transportation, especially before the upcoming winter break.


Sports-and-Society-1
Columns

Sports and Society: Making stuff up

The College Football Playoff is ridiculous. To demonstrate, let me paraphrase a conversation I heard between national analysts Danny Kanell and Ryen Russillo on the latter’s podcast about which teams deserve to make the playoff: Russillo argued that if Georgia beats Alabama, the question then becomes if Florida State should get into the playoffs over Texas, even with their backup quarterback.



Tok the Talk Column Graphic
Columns

Tok the Talk: Rachel Zegler and gender bias in the media

“If it hadn’t been so successful, I think people would have thought it was really weird. It’s a really weird story. But I think once it becomes mainstream, it’s difficult for people to see how strange the story is.” These wise words were spoken by Robert Pattinson (Twilight heartthrob, though he would probably hate to admit that) in a recent interview with Wonderland magazine. In hindsight, his comments are amusing, and if anything, sensible. The Twilight franchise is known for its peculiar nature, and Pattinson has detailed how the books are like “reading [Myers’] sexual fantasy.” Gross.


Image depicts a double decker bus with the words "double decker diary" in front.
Columns

Double Decker Diary: LinkedIn

Dear Diary, This is a story about LinkedIn. Part I. A couple of days intoFreshers Week, hundreds of students at theLondon School of Economics and Political Science crammed into a windowless gym. Spotted between tables with promotional trifolds: Men in Suits.


The Step Back
Columns

The Step Back: The heart of a champion

What defines an NBA champion? Domination? The hard road? Historical impact? With each season ending in a new coronation, how do we compare championships over time, and determine which teams are truly the best in NBA history?


graphic for Justin Hong's column "the budget line"
Column

The Budget Line: Boston under 30 bucks

We finally made it.Fall break officially starts on Wednesday, though for some, perhaps, it started as early as last Thursday. For many, it means heading home and catching up with family or friends from high school.


Graphic by Charlene Tsai
Column

The Policy Perspective: The importance of climate policy

Over the past few years, Tufts has made it easier and easier for students to act in environmentally conscious ways. One only needs to walk a few steps into the Joyce Cummings Center to see the carefully separated trash, recycling and compost bins with useful labels to help students dispose of their waste sustainably. These steps aren’t insignificant, but they’re often less significant than we are told or may assume. 


img_8993_original_720.jpg
Columns

Compost in the Daylight: The wishing tower

Once upon a time, I traveled to a small country in Eastern Europe with two friends. We signed up for a road trip of sorts with a talkative tour guide and one other tourist: a middle-aged man who consistently cradled a small camera. Our first stop was a town with a wishing tower.



extra innings-henry blickenstaff
Columns

Extra Innings: The two sweepstakes

There are two players that teams looking for a superstar this offseason will be all-in on. The first is, of course, Shohei Ohtani. We’ve been waiting all year to see where the two-time American League MVP plays next. The other is Juan Soto, who no one thought would be available this offseason, and who still might not be (it’s complicated). Here are my thoughts on where these two end up.



Column graphic for Claire woods “inside the MFA”
Columns

Inside the MFA: What not to miss

It would be impossible to see all of the nearly 500,000 pieces at the Museum of Fine Arts in one visit. You can check items off your MFA bucket list over time, but you can only see and appreciate so many pieces in one visit.


Weekly Wellness Graphic .jpg
Columns

Weekly Wellness: What supplements should you actually take

Vitamin B-12? Omega-3s? Calcium? Here’s a rundown of the supplements that you might want to implement into your routine to actually benefit your overall health. There’s no question that the supplement section is a daunting place to shop. From Flinstones gummy vitamins to sketchy-looking ‘magic’ pills, the shelves are stocked in an anxiety-inducing way that leaves shoppers, or at least myself, overwhelmed and settling for the first multivitamin on the shelf to avoid the whole fiasco in itself.


Graphic for Reese Christian’s Column “the hard count”
Columns

The Hard Count: The Deshaun Watson Problem

In last week’s column, I wrote about the success of the Houston Texans with CJ Stroud at quarterback, and I stated that the Texans had ‘finally’ found their franchise quarterback. This ignored a wrinkle in the Texans’ history, that being the promise of 2017 draft pick Deshaun Watson during four seasons in Houston.


graphic for Odessa Gaine's column "The Power of the Pen"
Columns

The Power of the Pen: The actors strike is over

The 2023 actors strike officially ended at 12:01 a.m on Nov. 9. PT. After 118 days, a deal was finally struck between SAG-AFTRA and major Hollywood studios. A unanimous agreement was made following negotiations on Nov. 8 that led to significant wins for the actors union. 


antisemitism.jpg
Column

Antisemitism Unpacked: The cyclical nature of antisemitism

In my last column, I discussed how antisemitism differs from other forms of racism because antisemitism allows a few Jews to very visibly succeed in society. Another important difference between antisemitism and other forms of racism is the cyclical nature of antisemitism. Oftentimes before the worst antisemitic massacres in history, Jews appear to be prosperous, well-integrated minorities.