Skip to Content, Navigation, or Footer.
The Tufts Daily
Where you read it first | Thursday, February 22, 2024

Features



The Setonian
Columns

Potty Talk: The wide world of bathrooms

In honor of commencement and the last ever Potty Talk, I have decided to turn my attention briefly away from Tufts University and toward everywhere else. In these next 500 words, I will attempt to review all of the world’s bathrooms that are not on Tufts University’s campus with my four-metric scale that some have called infallible. I can already hear the complaints of people who think that the earth has too many bathrooms to review them all in one column, but folks, I’ve probably spent more time reviewing bathrooms over the last two semesters than I have doing readings for class — I think I can handle this.


PursuitofEggcellence-01
Column

In Pursuit of Eggcellence: The finale

For my birthday this year, my mom got me an egg cup that is shaped like a knight. It has a little spoon for a lance. You take off the helmet, whack the eggshell with the little spoon until it opens, and eat the egg out of the suit of armor like a ravenous dragon. I highly recommend the experience. All I need now is a hoard.



The Setonian
Columns

Innocent Pleasures: Nature's poetry

Spring: The flirt of the seasons, in turns coquettish and bold and shy, is now upon us — at long last! Though loath to be disparaging of any such earnest enthusiasm (and respectful of the very real impacts of seasonal affective disorder), I cannot number myself among those rejoicers. 



‘충남_서해안벨트_마라톤_유세_2
Features

Students, faculty discuss geopolitical implications of South Korean presidential election

On March 9, Yoon Suk-Yeol won the South Korean presidency. Along with domestic social movements and housing policies, foreign policy existed as a central voting consideration in the presidential election. Most notably, South Korea’s role in the international sphere is shaped by its complex relationship with the United States, its only treaty ally, and China, its largest trading partner. Yoon, a former graft prosecutor with limited political experience, inherits the responsibility of a nation tasked with juggling these opposing forces.


kateinparis
Columns

Kate in Paris: On my own

This week, while I am on my Tufts-in-Paris spring break, I have found myself with five whole free days to spend in Paris, ones which I am trying to use to soak up the remaining time I have left in this incredible city.





gradeinflationf
Features

The ABCs of grade inflation at Tufts

If the letters ‘ABC’ send a chill down your spine, perhaps you’re a Tufts student and currently in the middle of midterm season. As Tufts becomes an increasingly competitive institution, here we will take a look at grades at Tufts in the national context of grade inflation.



Untitled-design-2-1
Features

Gap years promote personal growth, transformative experiences

With the sudden onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, many students were forced to reconsider their plans as schools shut down, internships were canceled and lockdowns were implemented around the globe. From Medford to Dubai, many Tufts students took gap years to gain professional experience, to prioritize their own physical and mental health and to explore passions outside of a classroom setting.


Untitled-design
Features

Canada’s national Inuit leader Natan Obed reflects on his journey of self-discovery through his senior honors thesis at Tufts

In the historic meeting between the Pope and Indigenous leaders from Canada on April 1, Pope Francis apologized for the Catholic Church’s role in the abuse against Indigenous children in residential schools that operated from the 1880s to the 1990s. According to the New York Times, the Canadian Truth and Reconciliation Commission approximates that “4,100 children went missing nationwide” from these residential schools, while some believe that the number is much higher. Pope Francis’ apology follows last year’s discoveries of more than 1,000 unmarked graves at former residential school sites across Canada.


New_building_of_Somerville_High_School_December_2021
Features

Tufts students from Medford and Somerville reflect on their hometown communities

For many Tufts students, the cities of Medford and Somerville are new and unfamiliar. They get to know the cities slowly, through weekend ventures to Davis Square or late night stops at Medford pizzerias. Other students, however, have called these communities home long before their time at Tufts. The cities that surround Tufts are not just their college towns but places that house their hometown high schools, childhood friends and family members. In conversations with the Daily, students from Medford and Somerville shared some of their stories, reflecting on what they’ve learned and how their hometowns have changed.



The Setonian
Column

Innocent Pleasures: An ode to Laundry Day and Carm’s charm

In the words of 2000s pop icon Hannah Montana, “Everybody makes mistakes, everybody has those days.” In my case, days were entire semesters spent sorely mistaken. This fortnight I’m shedding light not on the greatness of “Hannah Montana” (2006–2011) and other such defining shows of Disney Channel’s golden age — they need neither defense nor endorsement to be enthusiastically and unapologetically appreciated — but on the naivety of first-year me, who on any given day unhesitatingly answered with undue confidence “Dewick” to the age-old question of one’s dining hall preference.


kolumn
Columns

Kolumn: What we mean when we talk about nostalgia

Nostalgia is a Greek compound. It is the combination of the word νόστος (nóstos) or “homecoming” and ἄλγος (álgos), “pain and ache.” This deconstruction of the word precisely describes, in my opinion, the exclusively human feeling of bittersweetness, a mix of emotions that evoke a larger complex of sentiments.