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The Tufts Daily
Where you read it first | Thursday, February 22, 2024

Features

The Setonian
Columns

Potty Talk: Pearson Part 1 — level of discharge

I have never been in a Tufts building as mystifying as the Michael wing of Pearson Hall. To get there, you need only enter Pearson’s front door, take a right and then walk down a long, foreboding corridor as the decor slowly morphs decades into the past. The architect of this wing (presumably the eponymous “Michael”) seems to have been obsessed with bathrooms. Every floor in the Michael wing’s stairwell is marked in reference to its distance from the “discharge floor.” Naturally, I made it my goal to find this discharge floor and rigorously test its bathrooms (using the scientific method, of course).


mail
Features

Students revitalize Tufts Gaming Hub

From casual play to competitive teams, the Tufts Gaming Hub offers a space for students of all gaming skill levels to play, compete, share common interests and make new friends. Composed of a Discord server of over 700 members, the club hosts an expansive community centered around all things gaming. 


The Setonian
Features

Talking Transit: Something the T can actually be proud of

I often feel that this column complains too much. What can I say, there are a lot of problems with the T! But in an attempt to not get bogged down in negativity and nitpicking this week, it is worth stopping sometimes to appreciate what riders in our system have to be grateful for. Thankfully, the America’s Best Bus Stop competition over at the wonderful publication Streetsblog has given us a perfect opportunity to do just that.


The Setonian
Column

Maker’s Space: The epoxy debate — an argument for creative freedom

If you spend a large amount of time on social media, it may be likely you have seen videos of colored liquid being poured into molds and onto wood slabs. And though it’s satisfying to watch the shimmering epoxy resin flow like water into various gaps and channels, spreading into every nook and cranny, these videos hide a secret war that has enveloped the craftsperson community.


IMG_0586-scaled
Features

Tufts student bands talk music, performing

From the rumbling practice rooms in the Granoff Music Center to various basements and stages across Tufts’ campus, student bands are drawn together by a shared love for live music. These bands are independently formed groups as opposed to registered student organizations. Some of them — Honeymoon, Fease, Salt Hog, Emperor Jones, Fossil and Chowder — are featured here, sharing their stories with the Daily.


kateinparis
Column

Kate in Paris: In Bordeaux

This weekend, along with the rest of the Tufts-in-Paris program, I boarded an early-morning train from Paris’ Gare Montparnasse and set off toward Bordeaux, a city in the southwest of France and a part of the country’s Aquitaine region.




The Setonian
Column

In Pursuit of Eggcellence: Trial #3 — The kettle

My mother was not happy about my last column’s raw egg-eating revelation. Immediately after I sent her the link, I received a text reading “Girl!” (my mom texts like she just stepped off the set of “Clueless”), “This is not how I raised you! What were you thinking!” I countered with some salient points about my current aliveness and frequent consumption of raw cookie dough and received a trio of spiral-eye emojis in response. So, in an effort to please the payer of my tuition, this week I will set aside the poaching and make an attempt with my old standby, the electric kettle.


The Setonian
Column

Potty Talk: A celebrity in our bathrooms

This week, rumors flew around Tufts’ campus. Everyone could feel a disturbance in the plumbing as someone of great import was touring our bathrooms. Senator Elizabeth Warren, D-MA, was hanging out in the Campus Center trying to make new friends. In that process, she probably ended up using at least one of the Campus Center’s many bathrooms. In the wake of this monumental occasion, I chose to take on what are likely to be some of the most trafficked facilities at Tufts University — the Mayer Campus Center bathrooms. Specifically, I will attempt to tackle both the Hotung bathrooms and the all-gender bathroom.




kateinparis
Columns

Kate in Paris: Visitors

Two weeks ago, thanks to several Tufts friends who came to visit Paris (and me), I had the chance to reexperience the city through their eyes and feel the excitement of Paris all over again.  



maskk-min
Features

Mask recycling initiative expands across Tufts campuses

During the COVID-19 pandemic, masks have become an essential part of daily life. Unfortunately, single-use masks generate a lot of waste, which is important to consider amid climate change. A mask recycling initiative implemented by the Office of Sustainability aims to manage this increased waste. TheOOS Recycling and Waste Reduction Coordinator, Kaitlyn Reed, oversees this initiative. Reed feels the initiative is important in drawing attention to the number of masks that Tufts goes through as well as focusing on managing waste aside from traditional recycling bins.


The Setonian
Column

Potty Talk: Boweling Hall

Most Tufts students probably haven’t been in Dowling Hall since their campus-touring days in high school. Others visit frequently to pick up the newest copy of JUMBO Magazine. Whichever camp you fall into, Dowling Hall’s bathrooms are indubitably the gateway into Tufts lavatories.



The Setonian
Column

Talking Transit: At the end of the day, everything is old and sucks

Last week had a lot of transit news, and a lot of it was pretty good even! Notably, we got the first branch of the Green Line Extension, and the MBTA released their brand spankin’ new five-year capital investment plan. The plan itself showed promise, even though it frustratingly still has no real concrete plan for converting the commuter rail into an electrified regional rail network.


The Setonian
Features

Maker's Space: There's no such thing as a creative type

The other day, I was watching a furniture-making video that was thematically centered around creativity, specifically upon the distinction between creative and uncreative ‘types.’ In the video, the creator argued that though he himself did not feel like a creative type, he could still experiment and explore within his craft and eventually make something artistic and beautiful. Later, while on break (hallelujah!), I heard a family member lament the fact that she was not — and had never been — creative.



The Setonian
Columns

Innocent Pleasures: The magic of middle-grade fiction

The Tufts English Society Instagram lies. Contrary to what the account’s introduction of me as the society’s public relations manager claims (and setting aside the question of whether a play can rightfully be considered a book), Sophocles’ “Antigone” (circa 441 B.C.) is not my favorite written work. The objective of this column is to uplift the practices that spark joy in us, to remove guilt from the equation of pleasure-partaking. Yet in the previous context, and most other ones, I won’t publicly profess my love for “The Seems: The Glitch in Sleep”(2007) — my actual favorite book and possibly the closest thing I have to religion. It’s smart, clever, punny, begins with an NDA, raises philosophical queries about metaphysics and faith and is written for 10- to 14-year-olds.